Wednesday, April 25, 2007

"Crime wave" ignores drug dealing bailiff, rapist cop and city embezzlement; Human vs. dog---kid vs. cat; Retirement centers or methadone clinics?

This week's Cherokeean Herald claims a "crime wave" has hit the area after teenagers try to steal a parked car and go on a joyride, an Alto ISD student brings a knife to school resulting in a lockdown, and another kid gets caught breaking and entering.

What the hell does the local media call the last 30 years of law enforcement stealing and dealing drugs in the city halls, local precincts and steps of the courthouse in Rusk, TX? Cherokee County Pct. 3 constable Randall Thompson working as the district court bailiff is doing 12 years for intent to distribute meth.

60 year-old veteran police chief of Troup, TX (half the town is in Smith County and the southern part in Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketCherokee County)
was sentenced in Dec. 2006 to 10 years for stealing and tampering with seized drugs, and 3 years for his pot head second in command Sgt. Mark Turner.


And the Smith County DA has decided to not to SEAL the personnel records of Chester Kennedy and Troup's Chamber of Commerce "2005 Officer of the Year" Sgt. Samuel "Mark" Turner.
According to the Smith County crime lab, the Troup police department covering both Smith and Cherokee County hasn't sent drug seizure samples in 5 years.



That doesn't sound like a "crime wave" to the Cherokeean-Herald?

What does the Cherokeean Herald call the theft of over $150,000 in government funds by a still UN-INDICTED Rusk city employee?

What does the local media call the rape of 9 Jacksonville, TX women over a 3 year period by a Cherokee County police officer? And God knows how many on the side of the road?
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Larry Pugh, Jacksonville TX patrolman

What does the paper have on the racially motivated beatings of innocent black people at the hands of Cherokee County law enforcement?

In this story posted by the Tyler Morning Telegraph from the AP wire
http://www.tylerpaper.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2007704250344
a bill pending in Austin making it a felony offense for an attack dog to bite humans. The owner of a vicious dog could get 20 years in prison for a serious attack.
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Keep your dogs on a leash! We want this “crime wave” to pass. For every dog bite reported in Cherokee County, the crime stats begin to match neighboring counties.

Some people have to solve the dog problems themselves, before the Cherokee County District Attorney's office and its interns can travel to South Padre and Austin to "testify" about the stray marauders, and champion another preventable Cherokee County fatality.

The Cherokeean Herald failed to report on a local Alto, TX teenager shooting neighbor's cats, as reported on the AP wire and picked up by the Marshall News Messenger and the Lufkin Daily News.

The Alto, TX youth came onto a neighbor's property to watch his pit bull destroy a family pet, then got to watch his dog bite the bullet.
This article cites Grace Sharp, living on a farm between Rusk and Alto, TX . A common lament on how and why her 13 year old neighbor can get away with shooting her cats and trespassing on her property armed with a shotgun and a pit bull. The pit bull was shot by Sharp's husband, after it attacked the family dog in the pool. No legislation needed. No need to pack a bag and suntan lotion for Corpus --I mean Austin, just yet. PETA has been notified, even though the Cherokee County media is too cowardly to report it and county officials are too arrogant to respond.

PETA has attempted contact with both Cherokee County attorney Craig Caldwell and Sheriff James Campbell and has urged its followers to get involved in the illegal cat shooting. PETA has also been recently alerted to more animal cruelty on the 13-year-old's property, where pit bulls are alleged to be starved then trained to kill pigs.

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Sounds like good ol' East Texas entertainment, watching a HOG-DOG rodeo; doesn't matter to Cherokee County prosecutors and the Sheriff's Department that its ILLEGAL under State law. Penal Code Title 9, Chapter 42, Section 42.091 and 42.10---animal cruelty and dog fighting.

Mrs. Sharp, formerly or Alto, Texas, simply doesn't understand the complex machination that is Cherokee County. Her complaint fell on deaf ears because the neighborhood kid is related to the same people she called to enforce the law; the same people handling her complaint. The same people that strolled across her property taking pictures of the scene. The same people who refuse to acknowledge her UN-neighborly problem or persue animal cruelty charges on the youth or dog fighting on his parents.

How can anyone enjoy their dream homes and retirement in rural Cherokee County?

Well, Agriculture Commissioner and former Cherokee County state senator Todd Staples (R) suggests Rusk, TX can cater to retirees, by building certified retirement communities similar to the urban development out of region.

Sounds like a great idea for the rural economy, but the grant monies will be stolen and spread around like PI√ĎATA candy. Certainly former state senator Senior Todd Staples (R-Palestine, TX) means well for his East Texas brethren and constituents,
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket however there will have to be some government oversight if turning over federal money to one of the most corrupt counties in the state. Remember these are the people that stood behind the hiring of police impersonator Michael Meissner last month.
http://www.michaelmeissner.com/

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Does Austin know about that oversight? That Mr. Meissner has been employed in several cities within this district, even though he has an arrest record, a bogus criminal justice degree and he's not even a commissioned peace officer? As long as the county commissioners that hired him get to build some sanctuaries, we guess the grant money will be well spent.

Todd Staples might be bringing the bacon home to Cherokee County, but no one can ever smell it cooking. They CAN smell the methamphetamines wafting in the breeze in around New Summerfield and Rusk, where their most trusted law enforcement and speed labs reside.

Commissioner Staples (R) also predicts "growing opportunities" for Cherokee County. Again, with all due respect, the only booming economy Cherokee County, Texas has is the cyrstal meth production by your law enforcement. Don't act surprised when the State of Texas audits the Urban Development money you try to funnel to your constituents in Rusk, Texas. It going to wind up being shot up into some trucker's ass. Of course 10% of the proceeds could go into someone's re-election campaign, since those billboards on Highway 69 can get expensive.

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